Want to change industries? Use keyword searches on LinkedIn.

Photo by LinkedIn Sales Solutions on Unsplash

I have been working in the defense industry for about 11 years, and I am interested in finding a job in a new industry. The problem is that the local software engineering scene is primarily made up of defense contracting companies. We have a few insurance and manufacturing companies around, but that severely limits my options. I am not opposed to working remotely and would actually prefer it after working remotely for the last year.

When you search for jobs on LinkedIn, there is often an Industry section with some keywords you can use in your search. LinkedIn used to…


CODEX

A mathematician’s perspective on short variable names

Image of stringified-code. Used to express how one might get lost in code with long identifiers.
Image of stringified-code. Used to express how one might get lost in code with long identifiers.
Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

While I was writing this post I came across the Wikipedia page for programming naming conventions. In the Length of identifiers subsection, there are some pros and cons to what I plan on describing. Identifiers (variable and function names) that are too short may not have enough information encoded in them for anyone to be able to determine their meaning and purpose. While on the other hand, identifiers that are too long may cause a similar problem in that they cause code to seem cluttered and hard to read.

Back in college, I remember a professor reading my code for…


Most developers would agree with this and, without fail, people would wave at me or tap me on the should as I got into a groove and had headphones on!


With the desensitization of COVID statistics some want to return to offices. I love teleworking and here is why…

When I first entered the workforce after college I really wanted to go work in an office. Part of this is that I grew up seeing those who went to offices (mostly on TV and later on in-person) as being people who had life figured out and who doesn’t want that?

Photo by Chris Montgomery on Unsplash

As we grow up and spend some time in an office, we learn that no one knows what they are doing. We’re all just making up life as we muddle our way through life and this is even more obvious for our most incompetent co-workers.

I also wanted to…


Markdown is wonderful language with plain-text formatting that allows the writer to convert their writing into several formats.

Self-referential cover photo.

As a programmer, I tend to write a lot of my code and non-code in VSCode or light-weight tools. And this extends to my Medium articles. Medium used to let you upload Markdown directly into their editor or import the story from a Markdown gist[1]. I believe I’ve found an acceptable alternative to importing Markdown that some developers may appreciate.

In VSCode if you install the Markdown All in One tool, you can get a preview of your Markdown as you type it.

Example

You can see things like:

  • unordered lists
  • … although I don’t think Medium supports sub-bullets
  1. or numbered


Photo by Mathyas Kurmann on Unsplash

In Concourse, resources are comprised of three parts check, in, and out. Here we will be discussing the out, what it needs to do, and try to cover some questions you might have when trying to write your own Concourse resource.

The out can be performed any time you have something you want to put into it.


In Concourse, resources are comprised of three parts: check, in, and out.

Photo by K. Mitch Hodge on Unsplash

In Concourse, resources are comprised of three parts check, in, and out. Here we will be discussing the in, what it needs to do, and try to cover some questions you might have when trying to write your own Concourse resource.

The in is performed after a check has confirmed there is something there to pull from and has provides information that will be sent to the standard-in of the in script.


Photo by JESHOOTS.COM on Unsplash

In Concourse, resources are comprised of three parts check, in, and out. Here we will be discussing the check, what it needs to do, and try to cover some questions you might have when trying to write your own Concourse resource.

The check is typically performed before anything can use the resource. This can be seen if you click on a resource block (smaller blocks on the left-hand side of a task).


In this article I am going to give a brief overview about resources and link to my GitHub repository with a working Concourse resource written in Python. I will also write subsequent articles going more in-depth about each stage of resource. I will update this article with links to the check, in, and out articles.

Photo by Silvia Fang on Unsplash

Writing a Concourse resource is not terribly difficult, but instructions on how to do so are generally incomplete. I have managed to stitch together a couple of resource using these tutorials and GitHub repository as guidance:

Alexander Jansing

Data Scientist / Software Engineer Engineer with Five Years of Experience. I love getting lost in a good problem.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store